The Indicative and Imperative Moods

Gary DeLashmutt and Dennis McCallum
As the list indicates, the New Testament uses indicative statements when discussing what God has done, is doing or will do. Imperative statements are used when saying what we should do. It is important to realize, not only that both moods are present in the Bible, but that there is a specific relationship between these two moods in the area of sanctification. Namely, what God commands us to do (the imperative) is based upon what he has done, is doing or will do (the indicatives). God is signifying by this consistent pattern that sanctification depends on God, but involves human volition and cooperation.

The Interaction of the Means of Growth

Dennis McCallum
The Means of Growth refer to the avenues through which God most commonly conveys his grace to walking believers. But partaking of only one or two means of growth will not result in a proportionate level of growth. The means of growth are a way of life. They form a matrix of balanced living which is upset by the absence of even one. For instance, suppose a believer was involved in regular fellowship, read his Bible and ministered to others, but never, or only rarely prayed! This chart examines how the dynamic relationship between different means of growth works.

The Logic of Salvation

Dennis McCallum and Gary DeLashmutt
How do you explain grace and its implications to someone who has never heard of the concept before? Relevant verses back up each point.

The Mystery Hidden for Aeons Past

Dennis McCallum
Any careful reader of Old Testament messianic prophecy quickly becomes aware of the two portraits of Messiah found there. On the one hand, we have the picture of the reigning Messiah, who banishes his enemies and lives forever. On the other hand, we have the portrait of the suffering servant. This one "has no stately form or majesty," lives in obscurity, is rejected by the people, and dies badly. But his death is redemptive like a guilt offering, and he is raised from the dead to lead many to God and to glory. Christians are well aware that these two portraits correspond to the two comings of Christ: the first to suffer and atone for sin, and the second to reclaim the world for God and banish evil. Regardless of our millennial views, these two comings satisfy the Old Testament predictions in a very similar way.

The New Testament Definition of a Church

Dennis McCallum and Gary DeLashmutt

The New Testament Pattern of Church Discipline

Dennis McCallum
Though neglected by many congregations, church discipline is based on divine discipline and, therefore, is an act of caring love (Hebrews 12:5-12, Matthew 18:11-14). The practice encompasses a broad spectrum from casual correction to removal from fellowship, though all forms are meant to help believers mature spiritually and flee dangerous behaviors.

The Objectification of Religion: Universal Themes

Dennis McCallum
This paper is a study in the history of religion. "Objectification" is the religious tendency to reduce abstract principles to tangible, visceral objects and rituals. This tendency, found in all religious complexes, has also been prominent in Christianity, despite explicit prohibitions in the New Testament. The author believes objectification (also known as formalism) remains as one of the greatest stumbling blocks to people considering Christianity today.

The Postmodern Critique of Science

Dennis McCallum
Pastor Dennis McCallum charts the postmodern critique of the scientific method.

The Postmodern vs. Grammatical Historical Approaches to Literature

Dennis McCallum
Pastor Dennis McCallum charts the different interpretive approaches of the postmodern and grammatical-historical views.